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    Friday 30 June 2017 at Manchester Metropolitan University
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    Human Resource Management (10th ed), co-written by CPP team member Prof Carol Atkinson
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Our PhD Students

Here you will find out about members of CPPs vibrant community of PhD students and details of the exciting research that they are engaged with!


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PhD Student Index

Zayed Abduhamael, Uzma Anwar, Sean Brophy, Charles Dahwa, Henry Elochukwu, Louise England, Xiao Huang, Sarah-Jane Lennie, Catrina Page, Shyamenda Purslow, Kevin Rodgers, Aleksandar Vladimirov.

PhD Student Profiles

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Zayed Abduhamael

Zee is interested in organizational behaviour. His research aims to examine the relationship between leadership style, productive organizational energy and job satisfaction. Further, it seeks to test the mediating role of productive organizational energy on the relationship between leadership style and job satisfaction. The empirical work is conducted at higher educational institutions in Saudi Arabia, and includes a comparison between public and private universities in respect of these relationships.

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Uzma Anwar

TBC

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Sean Brophy

Sean Brophy is interested in higher education and graduate outcomes. His current research deals with the role of place in graduate decision making.

Sean spent ten years at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania designing and managing customised executive education programmes for senior leaders at leading global organisations, including Accenture, Bank of America, BBVA, China Industrial Bank, the Income Tax Department of India, KPMG, the Ministry of State for Happiness of the UAE, Morgan Stanley, the Royal Bank of Scotland, and Twitter, among others.

Sean holds a BSc in Finance and an MSC in Higher Education from Oxford. He is a member of the Society for Research into Higher Education (SHRE) and was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts (FRSA) in 2015.

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Charles Dahwa

Charles’ research concerns the development of people management capability in Small and Medium-sized Enterprises (SMEs). In the UK, SMEs contribute 47% of private sector turnover and create 60% of private sector jobs and there is widespread interest in ensuring that they exploit their full potential as an engine for driving economic growth.

A contributory factor is the extent to which SMEs are effectively utilizing their human resource. Research into the effectiveness of people management practices has focused predominantly on larger organizations, and comparatively little is known about how SMEs develop and deploy people management capability.

Using a qualitative methodology, Charles’s research draws on the concept of entrepreneurial learning to illuminate how SME owner managers acquire and utilize human resource knowledge. His work aims to impact on policy in the field of SME sustainability and growth through informing the provision of evidence-based interventions.

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Henry Elochukwu

Louise is interested in authenticity in the workplace. Taking a multi-disciplinary approach, her research investigates authenticity utilising literature from organisational behaviour and philosophy. The research concerns the role of autonomy or freedom for authenticity and the creation of meaningful roles at work, these are roles which align with personal values and beliefs and have been shown to contribute to higher levels of psychological wellbeing.

The multi-disciplinary approach seeks to explore the mechanisms of authenticity from a new and interesting angle, synthesising the thoughts of philosophers such as Heidegger and Satre with current work-based authenticity research. The research aims to create practical methods for employers to encourage and support authenticity in the workplace.

Louise completed her master’s in human resource management at Manchester Met, researching the use of job-crafting in academic roles. She found that autonomy was hindered in many ways, including bureaucracy, excessive workload and lacking interpersonal opportunities, highlighting that autonomy is as much about the organisational culture as individual job-design.

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Louise England

Louise is interested in authenticity in the workplace. Taking a multi-disciplinary approach, her research investigates authenticity utilising literature from organisational behaviour and philosophy. The research concerns the role of autonomy or freedom for authenticity and the creation of meaningful roles at work, these are roles which align with personal values and beliefs and have been shown to contribute to higher levels of psychological wellbeing.

The multi-disciplinary approach seeks to explore the mechanisms of authenticity from a new and interesting angle, synthesising the thoughts of philosophers such as Heidegger and Satre with current work-based authenticity research. The research aims to create practical methods for employers to encourage and support authenticity in the workplace.

Louise completed her master’s in human resource management at Manchester Met, researching the use of job-crafting in academic roles. She found that autonomy was hindered in many ways, including bureaucracy, excessive workload and lacking interpersonal opportunities, highlighting that autonomy is as much about the organisational culture as individual job-design.

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  • TBC
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Xiao Huang

My research concerns the impact of human resource development practices on the sustainable development of UK-based family-owned SMEs. In case of UK, family-owned SMEs account for 60% of total employment, 78% of new job positions, and more than 65% of wages that were paid. Therefore, how to use HRD efficiently is very important for economic growth. However, the current dominant theories and models of HRD are originated from the context of larger organizations, and the study of human resource development has been largely ignored in the context of family-owned SMEs.

In my research, when measuring the impacts, various stakeholders of SMEs would be taken into consideration. The characteristics of UK market and family businesses would also be considered. Both structured questionnaire and semi-structured in-depth interview will be adopted, in order to test the effect of HRD practices from the organizational and individual level.

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Sarah-Jane Lennie

Sarah-Jane is concerned with emotional authenticity and how emotional dissonance affects the mental health of front line police officers. With a fifteen year career as a police officer Sarah-Jane is driven to address the emotional labour carried out by front line police officers dealing with traumatic events on a daily basis.

Using a longitudinal audio diary process and narrative analysis, Sarah-Jane seeks to identify how emotional suppression as an organisation and societal requirement contributes to levels of burnout out and resulting mental health absence. Sarah-Jane is passionate about authentic story telling as a way to capture individual emotional experience and to create awareness of an otherwise taboo subject.

It is her ambition that the research conducted through her PhD will influence a change in attitude towards mental health support in the police services of Britain

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Catrina Page

Catrina is interested in freelance working and employee engagement strategies as well as trying to understand what aspects of freelance work drive job satisfaction and well-being. Her work explores whether there is a difference between autonomy in work (i.e. how the task is done) and autonomy over work (i.e. where, when, and even if the task is undertaken). As a permanent member of staff this volitional aspect over work projects and assignments might be lower than for freelance workers. With this distinction in mind, Catrina is investigating whether this difference impacts on well-being and job satisfaction.

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Shyamenda Purslow

Shyamenda is investigating levels of felt authenticity at work with the aim of developing a multi-level understanding of the role of authenticity over the career span. He completed his masters and undergraduate qualifications in Human Resource Management with MMU and remains involved with the HR profession as an ambassador for the CIPD. He works as an associate lecturer for the Department of Management and the Department of Accounting, Finance and Economics on various courses.

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Kevin Rodgers

Kevin’s research explores whether individual personality traits, in this case Work Role Authenticity and Corporate Authenticity, affect openness to internal communication (IC) in organisations. The key question this piece of research will answer is whether people who feel more connected to their Work Role i.e. Engineer, Social Worker etc. react to internal communication differently compared to those who feel more connected to their organisation i.e. an employee at company ‘X’. The secondary question is what impact this will have on pre-determined outcomes e.g. Well-being, Commitment, Intention to leave, Satisfaction, Stress, Performance, Autonomy, Work Engagement. Biographical moderators like age and gender will provide additional information about this complex and important relationship.

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Aleksandar Vladimirov

Aleks is a place branding professional with a current research interest in how places compete for the attention of talent. In particular, the PhD project he is investigating looks at the behavioural biases displayed by university graduates when making judgements about place brands as career destinations. The study will look to contribute to academia and practice by further extending behavioural science into the realm big, life changing decisions made under conditions of uncertainty and build on the understanding of places as brands that can communicate different value propositions to varying audiences.

His academic background is in International Relations and Marketing, holding a BSc from Aston University and an MSc from Warwick University. His professional career to date has involved working on consumer goods brands, licensed brands, small brands, big budget brands and currently the place brand of Shrewsbury, UK – the birthplace of Charles Darwin.

Supervisory team
  • TBC

Professor Ben Lupton
Centre Director

Telephone number
(0161) 247 6460
Email address
cpp@mmu.ac.uk

Download Brochure (PDF)

2017 PhD Bursary

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